The Science and Poetry of Messy thinking

This is a cross post from Design@Open This post started out as a few reflections on a few distance design education events I attended recently, where most of the discussions did not centre around online vs face-to-face or technology and IT services. Instead, discussion focused on learning and teaching – basic stuff, like ideas aroundContinue reading “The Science and Poetry of Messy thinking”

The Guide to Creating Distance Design Courses is finally here!

As noted in this post, it’s been a bit quiet because time’s gone into producing the new guide for Creating Distance Design Courses, which is now available here: https://distancedesigneducation.com/creating-distance-design-courses/ It took a bit longer than expected (it started out as a blog post but ended up being a 20k word monster!), so there’s a fewContinue reading “The Guide to Creating Distance Design Courses is finally here!”

Recipe: Making the design process visible

Lawson famously noted that, in observing the design process, “…there is not a lot of action to be seen and what is there cannot be readily understood.” (Lawson, 2005 p.216). This gives us a bit of a challenge in distance design education: if it’s hard enough to ‘see’ it in a traditional setting, how doContinue reading “Recipe: Making the design process visible”

Gone quiet… Academic Call for More Noise!

It’s been a bit quiet over the past couple of weeks (although there have been a couple of nice recipes from @mjleht on One-shot video and @morkelj on Online final design reviews. As well as a great reflection piece from @jamesbrownontheroad : From denial to acceptance: a turning point for design studio in architecture education) The peaceContinue reading “Gone quiet… Academic Call for More Noise!”

Meetup 04: What next?

The fourth #DistanceDesignEd Meetup was held on Tuesday 24 March, asking the question ‘What next?’. The live note document is here and this also has a capture of the text chat. Please keep adding to this (resources, comments, ideas). Thanks to all contributors so far and a huge thank you to everyone who took partContinue reading “Meetup 04: What next?”

Meetup 03: Crisis Curriculum

The third meetup was held on Wednesday 8 April 2020 on the subject of Crisis Curriculum (full recording below). You can find the meeting notes here (please feel free to keep adding). And you can find the presentation with prompt questions here. As always, a huge thank you to everyone who contributed to the discussion.

Recipe: Quick social studio

This recipe comes from The Open University course U101: Design Thinking, where, right at the start of the course, we want students to engage with the material in an active way that will encourage them to continue. At the same time, the activity has to: introduce students to distance learning; introduce them to the subjectContinue reading “Recipe: Quick social studio”

Editorial: Ed Tech defining design curriculum

If you’d asked me ‘What drives your design curriculum?’ a few weeks ago I wouldn’t have said Zoom. I’ll shortly have to add a whole list of other technologies, services and ed-tech that are emerging as “class leaders” (That was a satirical pun, by the way). This tech changes how we teach. But I’d argueContinue reading “Editorial: Ed Tech defining design curriculum”

Update 02 (2 April)

Since the last update we’ve been chasing down a few recipes (thank you to everyone who has volunteered a contribution). We also had our first (and hopefully last) Zoombombing, so apologies to everyone who was affected by this. If you are using Zoom semi-publicly, please take some basic precautions. But this won’t stop us meetingContinue reading “Update 02 (2 April)”

Recipe: The Blackboard studio model

This recipe was inspired by a discussion with Steve Rigley (@s_rigley) and a studio model he and colleague Jo Petty used to maintain at the Glasgow School of Art. Central to the general studio in graphic design was The Blackboard. A real blackboard, by the way. With chalk. The Blackboard became the central organising technologyContinue reading “Recipe: The Blackboard studio model”